What’s in a blog (or should be)?

In my last post, I concluded that I am a sucker for books on writing, so yesterday I lived up to my label, got up early, poured myself a cup of coffee and read We Are Not Alone: The Writer’s Guide to Social Media by Kristen Lamb.  Her blog is in my blog roll, just to the right of this post if you want to check it out.  I like it.  In her book, she argues that in the current competitive publishing market, anyone interested in writing and actually publishing a book must create a platform to help achieve success.   Even unpublished authors like me, from the get go, should focus on establishing relationships with future readers to help ensure success and sales.  Having worked in sales, this makes sense, and of course, the way to create these relationships is through social media.

As I read, I felt pretty good.  So far I’m on track for just beginning this whole journey in the past few months.  Except for Twitter.  It still scares me a bit, and I reside in the land of the “tweetless.”

I also don’t link all my blogs to my Facebook page or even post on Facebook much, mostly because I’m a mom with two teenagers.  Many of my “friends” are actually my kids’ friends, so I can keep an eye on the lot of them.  (I guess that makes me either a creepy stalker mom or an aware parent – I’ll choose the latter but that’s another blog).  At this point it is more of a parenting tool, not a tool to build my author’s platform, but that will change, eventually . . . hopefully.

For now, my author building platform is this blog, and I’m comfortable with that – one step at a time here.

One of the most interesting arguments Lamb makes is that authors should use their blogs to establish themselves as someone with expertise in their area or genre, even if they’re writing fiction.  To do this, I should blog on topics that relate not just to writing, or the craft of writing, but to whatever my novel or genre is about.  This idea resonated with me.  For example, this blog, so far, has been about writing and my creative process.  This appeals to writers, judging from the comments and traffic I’ve had, but not necessarily to my future readers.  My novel is not about writing; it’s a story, but my posts have been about me and my creative process.  I don’t want to sell me (that’s a whole different business that my husband would probably object to); someday I want to sell books!  I can use this blog to not only talk about the writing of the books, but also about what’s in them.  That makes sense.

In my novel, I use a quilt as a strong thread (no pun intended) between two intertwined narratives, one contemporary and one historical.  I also quilt and have learned it’s an essential piece of my own creativity.  Every time I’ve posted references to my own quilting or quilts in general, traffic on this blog increases.  Interesting!

With that said, I’ll be experimenting with this strategy and writing a little bit more to my future readers on this blog by including a greater focus on quilts, quilt history, quilt fiction – both contemporary and historical, historical fiction and even historical tidbits about mid-19th century America I discover as I research.  I’ll still be writing about writing, my creative process, or anything else that seems relevant because, well, I just like to (even if it may not be strategic).  I enjoy reading blog entries that are just good essays/writing like this one I read this morning, “The Corn Lady of Hillbilly Road,” and I may start writing some of those too.

Obviously, this blog is a work in progress on this writing journey.  I’ll keep you posted on how this new strategy is working out, or you keep me posted!  Thanks for reading.